Saturday, April 30, 2011

Strange happenings-Fiesta de Santa Marta de Ribarteme

Fiesta de Santa Marta de Ribarteme

Every year in Las Nieves, Spain, people who have suffered a near death experience in the previous year get together to attend Mass in celebration of Saint Marta de Ribarteme, the Patron Saint of resurrection. But here is the twist: they turn up at Mass carrying a coffin, or being carried in a coffin. After Mass, the coffins all proceed to the top of a nearby hill with a statue of the saint. Despite the somberness of the event, people light fireworks and shopkeepers fill the streets to sell religious objects


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Friday, April 29, 2011

Greatest historical myths-Columbus proved that the Earth was round

Columbus proved that the Earth was round

It was American author Washington Irving, some 500 years after Columbus sailed to America, who first portrayed the Italian explorer as launching on his voyage to prove that the Earth was round, defying the common, flat-earther belief of the time. In fact, most educated Europeans in Columbus’s day knew that the world was round. Since the fourth century BC, almost nobody has believed that the Earth is flat. Even if that wasn’t the case, Columbus would never have set out to prove that the Earth was round… simply because he didn’t believe it himself! Columbus thought that the Earth was pear-shaped. He set sail to prove something else: that Asia was much closer than anyone thought. Even in this, he was wrong. To further besmirch his memory, it should also be noted that he never set foot on mainland America. The closest he came was the Bahamas.

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Thursday, April 28, 2011

Bizarre facts-Ancient Chinese tradition

The photograph below is of a male Eunich.

A eunuch is a castrated man; the term usually refers to those castrated in order to perform a specific social function, as was common in many societies of the past.

In ancient China castration was both a traditional punishment (until the Sui Dynasty) and a means of gaining employment in the Imperial service.

At the end of the Ming Dynasty there were 70,000 eunuchs in the Imperial palace.

The value of such employment—certain eunuchs gained immense power that may have superseded that of the prime ministers—was such that self-castration had to be made illegal. The number of eunuchs in Imperial employ had fallen to 470 in 1912, when their employment ceased. Eunuchs castrated before puberty were also valued and trained in several cultures for their exceptional voices, which retained a childlike and other-worldly flexibility and treble pitch.
Such eunuchs were known as castrati. Unfortunately the choice had to be made at an age when the boy would not yet be able to consciously choose whether to sacrifice his sexual potency, and there was no guarantee that the voice would remain of musical excellence after the operation.

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Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Interesting facts-When the Niagara Falls ran dry

For six months in the summer and autumn of 1969, Niagara’s American Falls were “de-watered”, when the Army Corps of Engineers conducted a survey of the falls’ rock face, concerned that it was becoming destabilized by erosion. During that period, while workers cleaned the former river-bottom and drilled test-cores in search of instabilities, a temporary walkway was installed twenty feet from the edge of the dry falls, and tourists were able to explore this otherwise inaccessible landscape.

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Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Amazing animal-Fat squirrel

While the rest of the squirrels in the garden tend to put a few nuts aside for the winter, this tubby customer clearly believes in eating them all at once. He is a regular visitor to the feeding stations kept well stocked by animal lover James Phelps. Too regular, in fact. Mr Phelps, 51, has seen the fox squirrel, a native of North America, become so overweight that a low-calorie diet would seem to be required.



amazing-animal"He became used to me being around and probably associated me with food,’ he said at his home in Michigan. I would usually feed him myself, but sometimes my wife would help out. She also became fond of him because he’s so cute.'Many mornings he would be waiting for me to bring out the food, lounging on the deck looking into the house. Often he would stand and beg for more."


‘He makes a great subject for photography. He has great expressions, is curious and very smart. He’s the best-fed squirrel in Michigan and I guess that’s the reason he got so big.’

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Monday, April 25, 2011

Greatest historical myths-Edison invented the electric light

Edison invented the electric light

Thomas Edison is known as the world’s greatest inventor. His record output - 1,093 patents - still amazes us, over a century later. Astonishing, except for one thing: he didn’t invent most of them. Most Edison inventions were the work of his unsung technicians - and his most famous invention, the electric light, didn’t even belong to his laboratory. Four decades before Edison was born, English scientist Sir Humphry Davy invented arc lighting (using a carbon filament). For many years, numerous innovators would improve on Davy’s model. The only problem: none could glow for more than twelve hours before the filament broke. The achievement of Edison’s lab was to find the right filament that would burn for days on end. A major achievement, but not the first.

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Sunday, April 24, 2011

Amazing pictures-Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony

Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony At Rockefeller Plaza

November 30, the last day of autumn, a ceremony of lighting the main Christmas tree USA. Giant spruce height 22,5 m was installed at the central square of New York’s Rockefeller Plaza in mid-November. It took workers several weeks to decorate this gigantic green beauty: a garland for decoration, used a length of 8 kilometers from the 30,000 light bulbs and eat the top capped a huge star from Swarovski crystals. The annual opening ceremony of the Christmas tree is an important tradition initiated by the 30s, during the Great Depression. How many years before, in the ceremony to light the lights on the fir, whose age is 75 years old, attended the well-known singers, actors and journalists.


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Saturday, April 23, 2011

Amazing facts-What goes around

In 1965, at the age of four, Roger Lausier was swimming off a beach in Salem - he got into difficulties and was saved from drowning by a woman called Alice Blaise.


In 1974, on the same beach, Roger was out on a raft when he pulled a drowning man from the water - amazingly, the man he saved was Alice Blaise's husband.

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Friday, April 22, 2011

Dark world-Krampus

Krampus - The Evil Companion Of Santa

In Austria, Hungary and some other regions it's believed that Krampus accompanies Santa during the Christmas season, warning and punishing bad children. Usualy Krampus is represented by a demon-like creature.


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Thursday, April 21, 2011

Bizarre facts-Self Mummification

Sokushinbutsu were Buddhist monks or priests who allegedly caused their own deaths in a way that resulted in their being mummified. This practice reportedly took place almost exclusively in northern Japan around the Yamagata Prefecture.

For three years the priests would eat a special diet consisting only of nuts and seeds, while taking part in a regimen of rigorous physical activity that stripped them of their body fat. They then ate only bark and roots for another three years and began drinking a poisonous tea made from the sap of the Urushi tree, normally used to lacquer bowls.This caused vomiting and a rapid loss of bodily fluids, and most importantly, it killed off any maggots that might cause the body to decay after death.

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Finally, a self-mummifying monk would lock himself in a stone tomb barely larger than his body, where he would not move from the lotus position.His only connection to the outside world was an air tube and a bell. Each day he rang a bell to let those outside know that he was still alive.

When the bell stopped ringing, the tube was removed and the tomb sealed. You can read more about this practice here.

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Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Greatest historical myths-America became independent on July 4, 1776

America became independent on July 4, 1776

Hold the fireworks! As most American school children (and many non-American ones) are aware, America’s founding fathers signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. However, the war raged for another seven years before independence from England was finally granted on September 3, 1783. On that day, Britain’s George III and US leaders signed the Definitive Treaty of Peace.

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Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Amazing animal-Fat cat

Fat cat Giuly became famous after her owner Chiara Bagnoli from Florence, Italy, has uploaded her photos on the Net. Giuly is 5 years old, she loves to pose in front of the camera. 28-year-old Chiara Bagnoli says that the cat is lovely, very sweet and quiet. She loves the rain and to hug trees. Giuly is playful, but very lazy.


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Monday, April 18, 2011

Amazing facts-The first Photograph

The first ever photo of a person in 1838

This photograph of Boulevard du Temple in Paris was made in 1838 by Louis Daguerre, the brilliant guy that invented the daguerreotype process of photography. Aside from its distinction of being a super early photograph, it’s also the first photograph to ever include a human being. Because the image required an exposure time of over ten minutes, all the people, carriages, and other moving things disappear from the scene. However, in the bottom left hand corner is a man who just so happened to stay somewhat still during the shot — he was having his shoes shined.


amazing-facts

amazing-factsIt’s interesting how sheer luck earned the guy a place in the history of photography.

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Sunday, April 17, 2011

Strange happenings-She's Behind You!

Michael Dick had been travelling around the UK with his family to track down his daughter, Lisa - who he had lost contact with ten years earlier.

After a long fruitless search, he approached the Suffolk Free Press, who agreed to help him by putting an appeal in their newspaper.

Fortunately, his long lost daughter saw the appeal and the pair were reunited.

The odd thing was, his daughter had been right behind him when the free paper took the photograph - shown in the photograph above. What are the chances of that!

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Saturday, April 16, 2011

Bizarre events-Cheese rolling festival

Cheese rolling festival

The Cheese Rolling Festival is held every May in Cooper’s Hill, Gloucestershire in the United Kingdom. The festival involves an official tossing a cheese down the extremely steep hill, after which hundreds of people begin to run down the hill (risking life and limb) in order to catch the cheese. Each year the event results in casualties and for this reason children are not allowed to participate, though oftentimes boys from the local town will join in anyway. For the children, there is an uphill race. Women and men race separately in the main event.

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Friday, April 15, 2011

Greatest historical myths-Shakespeare wrote the story of Hamlet

Shakespeare wrote the story of Hamlet

William Shakespeare is generally known as the greatest playwright who ever lived, even though most of his plays were not original, but adaptations of earlier stories. “The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark” (1603), probably his most famous play, was based on an ancient Scandinavian story. But while it might not have been the original version of the story, we can safely assume it was the best.

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Thursday, April 14, 2011

Fascinating events-Buttenmandl Parade

People dressed as St. Nicholas, a knave in a traditional Bavarian woman's dress, two Gangerl and Buttenmandl make their way through the snow during the traditional Buttenmandl-Parade near the village of Bischofswiesen-Loipl, southern Germany. On the first Sunday of the Advent season, St. Nicholas is traditionally accompanied by twelve Buttenmandls and a knave when they go from house to house to give small presents to the children. Only unmarried men are allowed to parade as Buttenmandls, who are completely covered in straw and wear animal masks and cow bells.

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Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Dark world-Goose clubbing

Until recently, an annual festival was held in Germany in which a goose was tied by its feet to a post and then clubbed by the local men until its head came off. As a result of complaints from animal rights activists, the festival-goers now hit a goose which has previously been killed. A very similar event occurs in Spain every year in which a man hangs from the goose until the head comes off. Again the goose is killed prior to the event which dates back 350 years. The Spanish festival is called Antzar Eguna.

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Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Interesting facts-The most expensive book!

The Most Expensive Book in the World

A rare copy of the most expensive book in the world by Franco-American ornithologist John James Audubon sold more than eight million euros, on the auction house said, "Sotheby's".

The sale of the book "Birds of America" (Birds of America) in exchange for 7.3 million pounds (8,6 million euros) is a new world record price for the printed work is sold at auction
The estimated book value of between four and six million pounds.

The new owner is a dealer old books.

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interesting-facts
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interesting-facts

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Monday, April 11, 2011

Bizarre facts-Old tradition of Foot binding

Foot Binding

Foot binding was a custom practiced on young females for approximately one thousand years in China, beginning in the 10th century and ending in the early 20th century.

In Chinese foot binding, young girls’ feet, usually at age 6 but often earlier, were wrapped in tight bandages so that they could not grow and develop normally; they would, instead, break and become highly deformed, not growing past 4-6 inches (10-15 cm). Today, it is a prominent cause of disability among some elderly Chinese women. First, each foot would be soaked in a warm mixture of herbs and animal blood. This concoction caused any necrotised flesh to fall off. Then her toenails were cut back as far as possible to prevent ingrowth and subsequent infections. To prepare her for what was to come next the girl’s feet were delicately massaged. Silk or cotton bandages, ten feet long and two inches wide, were prepared by soaking in the same blood and herb mix as before.Each of the toes were then broken and wrapped in the wet bandages, which would constrict when drying, and pulled tightly downwards toward the heel. There may have been deep cuts made in the sole to facilitate this.

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Sunday, April 10, 2011

Conspiracies-The New World Order

Innumerable conspiracies revolve around the concept of a New World Order, that is, a dominating world power steadily and covertly spreading its influence and rising in strength, all for the purpose of bringing the world under a unified rule or master government.


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Saturday, April 9, 2011

Greatest historical myths-Captain Cook discovered Australia

Captain Cook discovered Australia

Many Australians will agree that this isn’t so - but for the wrong reasons. They will point out that, many years before Cook arrived in Sydney in 1770, Australia had already been visited by Dutchmen Abel Tasman and Dirk Hartog, and an English buccaneer, William Dampier. Of course, it had been previously been discovered some 50,000 years earlier by the indigenous Australians.

But in fairness to Cook, he did discover a new part of the country - and more importantly, this led to the first white settlers (an opportunity that Tasman, Hartog and Dampier didn’t take). So let’s say that Cook DID discover Australia! Fine, but Cook was actually a Lieutenant when he sailed to the Great South Land. The “captain” rank might be a minor point, but it’s certainly inaccurate - and as he is called “Captain Cook” so often that it might as well be his name, it’s one worth correcting.

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Friday, April 8, 2011

Amazing pictures-A parhelion

A parhelion (sundog) combined with a halo is seen over Lake Malaren in central Stockholm, Sweden on November 30, 2010. These weather phenomena are created by ice crystals in the atmosphere during cold weather. Stockholm was experiencing temperatures below minus 10 degree Celsius.

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Thursday, April 7, 2011

Bizarre events-Goat tossing festival

The Spanish certainly like their odd festivals. Every year on the fourth Sunday in January, the locals of a small town named Manganeses de la Polvorosa gather together for the goat tossing festival, in honor of St Vincent de Paul, their patron saint. The festival has been around for so long that no one knows when it started. It involves a young man who finds a goat in the village, ties it up, and takes it to the top of the local Church belfry. He then tosses the goat over the side and it falls 50 feet where it is (hopefully) caught by villagers holding up a sheet of tarpaulin. The village officials banned the event but it continues regardless. Various animal rights agencies have complained about it - though their complaints have also been ignored.

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Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Animal world-Hippo's escape

It happened last January in a small European country Montenegro. 11-year-old female hippo Nikica escaped from the private zoo she used to live in for the past nine years. It was an accidental escape that happened during a flood. The hippo who lived in the backyard swam over the fence into the streets of the town. 9 days later Nikica came back home.

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Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Strange happenings-Until Death did them part

In 1996, Paris police set out to investigate a late night, high speed car crash, both drivers had been killed instantly.

Investigations revealed that the deceased were in fact man and wife.

Police initially suspected some kind of murder or suicide pact but it became apparent that the pair had been separated for several months - neither could have known that the other would have been out driving that night - it was just a terrible coincidence.

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Monday, April 4, 2011

Dark world-Princess Diana

Princess Diana’s Death was no Accident

Proponents of the Diana death conspiracy claim that the Princess of Wales was assassinated by elements of Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service to prevent her allegedly deep relationship with the Egyptian Muslim film producer Dodi Fayed from tainting the purity and honor of the British Royal Family. It is believed that Diana was pregnant and planning to get engaged to Fayed.


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Sunday, April 3, 2011

Greatest historical myths-Nero fiddled while Rome burned

Nero fiddled while Rome burned

We all know the story of mad Emperor Nero starting the Great Fire of Rome in 64 AD, then fiddling while the city burned. However, this would have been impossible. For one thing, the violin wouldn’t be invented for another 1,600 years. OK, some versions of the story suggest that he played a lute or a lyre - but then, scholars place the emperor in his villa at Antium, 30 miles away, when the fire began. Though he was innocent of this disaster, however, there is much evidence to show that he was ruthless and depraved.

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Saturday, April 2, 2011

Bizarre facts-Unique paintings

Artist Kira Ayn Varszegi when creating her paintings uses so original technique that she came into the world's tabloids - instead of a brush she uses her breasts.


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Friday, April 1, 2011

Fascinating events-Naked festival

Hadaka Matsuri is a Japanese festival in which the participants are all but naked. The festival is celebrated many times throughout the year in various parts of Japan and those involved usually wear a type of traditional loin cloth. Some of those involved go completely naked which is not frowned on at all - in fact it is considered healthy. The festivals often involve the use of mud (for entertainment) and there are often separate women’s and men’s festivals. In some towns special festivals are held for children - as a rite of passage, but sometimes children participate in the adult festival. The festival has its origins as a religious event, but these days the religious aspects are virtually forgotten.

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