Monday, January 31, 2011

Tragic happenings-Smokestack demolition goes wrong

The demolition of the former Ohio Edison Mad River Power Plant’s 275-foot smoke stack in Springfield, Ohio, went awry because the demolition crew failed to notice a crack in the structure. The collapsing tower knocked down a pair of high-voltage electrical power lines and smashed into a building housing generators. Luckily no one was injured.

tragic-happenings
tragic-happenings
tragic-happenings
tragic-happenings
tragic-happenings
tragic-happenings

Read more...

Sunday, January 30, 2011

Bizarre facts-Museum of the Dead

Catacombs of the Capuchins (Italian Catacombe dei Cappuccini) located in the city of Palermo in Sicily, in which the clear remains of more than eight thousand people, most of the local elite and prominent citizens, the clergy, the aristocracy and the representatives of various professions. This is one of the most famous exhibition of mummies, skeletirovannye, mummified, embalmed body of the dead lie, stand, hang, form a composition.

bizarre-facts
bizarre-facts
bizarre-facts
bizarre-facts
bizarre-facts
bizarre-facts
bizarre-facts
bizarre-facts
bizarre-facts

Read more...

Saturday, January 29, 2011

Fascinating events-Baby in Parliament

Member of European Parliament took her Baby to work.

A member of European Parliament Licia Ronzulli took her 1-month-old baby to the Parliament session in Strasbourg. She wanted to make a point about the difficulties women face in trying to juggle careers and child care.

fascinating-events
fascinating-events
fascinating-events
fascinating-events

Read more...

Friday, January 28, 2011

Did you know-The Taliban: World's Next Minerals Superpower

The Taliban: World's Next Minerals Superpower
Gordon G. Chang
Afghanistan's resources raise the stakes in Central Asia.

This week the US Defense Department revealed that Afghanistan possesses at least $908.9 billion in untapped mineral resources. Iron accounts for $420.9 billion of the total, and copper $274.0 billion. There is cobalt, gold and molybdenum. The country could become, according to a Pentagon memo, the Saudi Arabia of lithium.” Just as interesting, there is niobium, used to make superconducting steel.

Most significantly, Afghanistan has substantial deposits of rare earth minerals, estimated to be worth $7.4 billion. And why is this so important? At present, China has a near monopoly over them. It posseses about 36% of world reserves, by far the biggest share for any nation, and accounts for around 97% of global production. Five years ago Beijing substantially tightened export controls on these minerals. At this moment, officials are building a strategic reserve of them.

Last August China's Ministry of Industry and Information technology announced it would prohibit exports of some heavy rare earth minerals and restrict exports of other rare earths to levels far below current global needs. The complete prohibition may go into effect by 2015.

Beijing, unfortunately, is not content to control just its own rare earth resources. The Chinese are buying deposits around the world, including those in the U.S. and Canada.

And that brings us back to Afghanistan. Beijing, not surprisingly, has already shown great interest in the resources of its troubled neighbor to the west. In 2007 a Chinese company won the concession to the Aynak copper mine in Afghanistan's Logar province-- after paying, according to American officials, a bribe of $30 million to the now-former minister of mines.

As the New York Times reports, the Chinese want to buy up even more of Afghanistan's resources. They will surely succeed in exploiting most of the trillion dollars of minerals if the Taliban fighters take back control of the country, as they will if President Obama adheres to his plan to begin withdrawing troops next July. The Taliban, in short, could become a minerals superpower in a few years time.

That will surely mean an even larger portion of the world's rare earth deposits will be under Chinese control. Beijing has traditionally maintained strong ties to the Taliban, continuing relations even after Sept. 11. Since that horrible event, for instance, China went through with the sale of a telephone system for Kabul and, after the group's ouster, has supplied it with weapons used against NATO forces.

The Pentagon, in September, is scheduled to complete its report identifying “national security risks due to rare earth material dependencies.” Yet we don't have to wait until then to know what it will say.

The U.S. is not mining any rare earth minerals at the moment, and there is only one American company with commercially significant deposits of heavy rare earths. It is not entirely clear what defense planners will do when China's export ban on these minerals goes into effect.

Rare earth minerals are used in every major weapons system the U.S. fields today, from M1A2 Abrams tanks to Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. There is not a plane in the American inventory that will fly tomorrow without some mineral that is now mined in China. Lasers, radar and missile-guidance systems? Yes, they all require rare earth minerals, as do the military's hard drives.

So the stakes just went up in Afghanistan with the release of the information this week. The U.S. has a critical reliance on what is in the ground in that war-torn land. Kabul can undercut Beijing's virtual monopoly on rare earths--or it can help the Chinese tighten their grip over global markets.

Read more...

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Interesting facts-Abandoned monument in Bulgaria

It was once one of the most famous monuments dedicated to communism. But after the end of communism era in Bulgaria this monument has been abandoned.

interesting-facts
interesting-facts
interesting-facts
interesting-facts

Read more...

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Amazing pictures-Unusual Wedding dresses

amazing-pictures


amazing-pictures
amazing-pictures
amazing-pictures
amazing-pictures
amazing-pictures

Read more...

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Amazing facts-The Longest Rail Tunnel

The Longest Rail Tunnel Under Alps In Switzerland.

Gotthard base tunnel is the longest railway tunnel in the world. It runs underneath the Alps in Switzerland and is scheduled for opening in 2017. The breakthrough to the east tube just happened in October of 2010. Gotthard base tunnel is the 36 miles long. The Gotthard Base Tunnel is actually two main parallel tunnels measuring a record-breaking 57km each, served by a maze of access tunnels, shafts and passages. In total there will be 153.5 km of tunnel through the Swiss Alps. The project has been conceived to solve the problem of heavy European road traffic on this major route through the Alps, while simultaneously developing Europe’s high-speed rail network. The existing tunnel, much higher up, can only handle three-truck freight trains of up to 2,000 tons. The new tunnel will take 4,000 ton heavy freight trains – carrying entire trucks on board – effortlessly through the heart of the mountains. Passenger trains will be able to travel at speeds of up to 250kmph, resulting in a train journey time between Zurich and Milan of just two hours and 40 minutes – a third less than at present. But digging a tunnel underneath 3,000m mountains is going to take all the skill of some of the world’s leading engineers. Much of the geology that lies beneath the mountains was unknown when the project began. Problems that would slow the project down and give rise to complex engineering challenges have been a feature of building the tunnel.

Implications have been marked in Switzerland as traffic has largely been in transit, rather than for Swiss producers or consumers. A motorway construction programme and the opening of the Gotthard road tunnel in 1980 greatly encouraged freight by road. General concern was joined by the shock of the multiple fatalities in the Gotthard and Mont Blanc road tunnel accidents. To control adverse environmental effects, the Swiss constitution incorporated Protection of the Alps in 1994. Previously during 1992, New Rail Link through the Alps programme was approved for building two base tunnels. These were to be relatively level alignments at lower levels than previous tunnels through the massif on the BLS Lötschberg and SBB Gotthard routes.



amazing-facts
amazing-facts
amazing-facts
amazing-facts
Workers hugged, cheered and set off fireworks as the huge drill broke through the last stretch of rock deep in the Swiss Alps. There was delight at the end of the tunnel – the world’s longest – when it was completed. The $10 billion, 35.4-mile tube will connect Europe’s high-speed rail network and is part of a larger effort to cut in half the number of trucks – now at 1.2 million – that thunder through the Alps each year.

The joy and pride felt throughout Switzerland over digging the Gotthard Base Tunnel reflected the one cause that unites the country’s wealthy city dwellers with those living in traditional villages: Protecting the beauty of the mountains.

Read more...

Monday, January 24, 2011

Interesting facts-Most expensive bicycle

Most Expensive Bicycle
Aurumania Gold Bike Crystal Edition
Price: $114,464*


Scandinavian design company Aurumania made only 10 of these hand-crafted, 24-carat gold-plated bicycles. Each is decorated with 600 Swarovski crystals. According to Chief Executive Bo Franch-Mærkedahl, this bike was originally conceived as a show piece but quickly attracted interest from buyers. The firm, founded in September 2008, has sold five units to buyers in the U.K., Dubai, Russia, Italy, and most recently, Australia.

interesting-facts

Read more...

Sunday, January 23, 2011

Bizarre events-Bullet with Henry's name

In 1893, Henry Ziegland ended a relationship with his girlfriend.

Tragically, his girlfriend took the news very badly, became distraught and took her own life.

Her distressed brother blamed his sister's death upon Henry, he went round to Henry's house, saw him out in the garden and tried to shoot him.

Luckily, the bullet only grazed Henry's face and embedded itself in a nearby tree.

In 1913, twenty years after this incident, Henry decided to use dynamite to uproot a tree in his garden. The explosion propelled the embedded bullet from the tree straight into Henry Ziegland's head - killing him immediately.

Read more...

Saturday, January 22, 2011

Strange happenings-Distorted Railway Line

Back in September there was a powerful earthquake in New Zealand and here are the most unbelievable images of the earthquake aftermath. The below pictures depict what earthquake and landslide can do to a railway line.

strange-happenings
strange-happenings
strange-happenings

Read more...

Friday, January 21, 2011

Interesting facts-Global Warming hoax

The global warming conspiracy states that the phenomenon of global warming is a scientific hoax concocted to provide the government with an excuse to raise taxes, climate science researchers with an opportunity to draw greater monetary support, the UN with support to propagate a “system of world government” [via Wikipedia] and/or several other distinct motives.


interesting-facts

Read more...

Thursday, January 20, 2011

Amazing facts-Britain's oldest colour television

Britain's oldest colour telly 'still going strong' 42 years on, says 69-year-old owner
By Luke Salked

For 42 years Derek Wills has had the same television – and not once has he had to call out the repair man.

The 22 inch TV was among the first colour sets in Britain. Indeed, with an infra-red remote it was the last word in home entertainment.

The set has weathered the video age, the arrival of DVDs, satellite, cable and digital and not once has it so much as blinked.



amazing-facts
amazing-facts
amazing-factsMr Wills has watched everything from the first man walking on the moon to the fall of the Berlin Wall to England's 2005 Ashes victory on his trusty 42-year-old telly

It may be the oldest working colour TV in Britain but, says 69-year-old Mr Wills, the picture is still so good that only HD TV betters it.

He bought the set in 1968 for more than £300 so that he could watch the likes of Dixon of Dock Green and Z Cars.

The BBC had only just begun its colour broadcasts in 1967.


Since then, he estimates he has watched as many as 70,000 hours on it, witnessing milestones such as the fall of the Berlin Wall and the freeing of Nelson Mandela, not to mention 11 World Cups.

Mr Wills, a former engineer, said: ‘It was far, far ahead of its time. It’s got a beautiful picture. It takes a Freeview box and gives all the stations. It was a lot of money in those days but it was really good.


‘The neighbours used to come round to see it. We had a great big H aerial on the roof and used to get quite a good signal.

‘Obviously, HD knocks spots off it today, but for its day it was brilliant.

Read more...

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Strange facts-Fidel Castro tried for a Baseball team

strange-facts

Read more...

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Top 10 War Animals of All Time

Top 10 War Animals of All Time

Humans have enlisted animals to help fight their battles since the dawn of war, and today’s militaries use an even wider range of creatures for everything from bomb sniffing to coastline patrolling. Here we count down some of the creatures that have become unwitting recruits in both ancient and modern warfare.

1. Bat Bombs

These nocturnal flying mammals became part of a bizarre animal experiment during World War II. A dental surgeon upset by the Japanese attack on the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor proposed attaching tiny incendiary bombs to bats. The creatures were meant to set thousands of small blazes across Japan’s cities as they flew to roost beneath building roofs. But the idea floundered after receiving the green light from President Roosevelt. Many uncooperative bats simply dropped like rocks or flew away, despite the U.S. Army using as many as 6,000 of the mammals in their experiments. The U.S. Navy spent $2 million after taking over the effort, before finally giving up. Still, the bat bombs did manage to set fire to a simulated Japanese village, a U.S. Army hangar and a general’s car. Nowadays, Pentagon scientists study how bat flight mechanics could inspire future aircraft designs and spy robots.
animal-world
2. Camel Cavalry

Camels only provide a few modern militaries with patrol mounts, but camel cavalry once flourished in certain regions of the world. Camels found much use in the arid or desert regions of North Africa and the Middle East during ancient times, given their ability to survive harsh and often waterless conditions. The smell of camels reportedly frightened enemy horse cavalry, even if the camels did not provide as much of a shock to enemy troops during charges. The Parthian and Sassanid Persians sometimes armored their camels as heavy cataphract cavalry (picture camels equipped with armor, artillery and carrying cavalrymen), and Arab warriors often rode camels during raids against other tribes or during the Muslim conquests of North Africa and the Middle East. Camels fared less well outside their natural ranges, where horses became the preferred battle mount. The combat role of camels rapidly declined with the development of guns throughout the 1700s and 1800s, but they still saw some action with British general Lawrence of Arabia and Arab forces during World War I.
animal-world
3. Angry Bees

Stinger-equipped bees could become effective weapons when provoked. The ancient Greeks, Romans and other civilizations occasionally used the insects as tiny weapons of war to deter enemy troops. Besiegers would sometimes catapult beehives over the walls, and Greek defenders of Themiscyra supposedly returned the favor by barraging Roman attackers with hives. The Heptakometes of the Trebizond region in Turkey even tricked Roman soldiers under the command of Pompey with a tribute of toxic honey, which led to the defeat of the subsequently vomiting, intoxicated Romans. A more direct use of angry bees continued during castle sieges of the Middle Ages, as well as during World War I and the Vietnam War. These days, U.S. scientists have found more peaceful uses for bees by training the insects to detect land mines.
animal-world
4. Sea Lion Patrol

California sea lions have gained odd fame in the service of the U.S. Navy’s marine mammal program, alongside dolphins and a beluga whale or two. The marine mammals have excellent low-light vision and underwater hearing, can swim 25 mph (40 km/h), and do repeated dives of up to 1,000 feet (300 m). The U.S. Navy has accordingly trained sea lions as minesweepers that can locate and mark mines. The animals can even attach a special leg cuff to human divers or saboteurs, which allows sailors to haul the suspects to the surface. A special sea lion harness also carries cameras that provide live underwater video. Just one sea lion, two human handlers, and a rubber boat can replace a full-sized naval vessel, its crew and a group of human divers in searching for objects on the ocean floor.
animal-world
5. Messenger Pigeons

Carrier pigeons carried messages for conquerors and generals throughout much of human history, based on their homing ability and navigational skills that enable them to return home across hundreds of miles. But the pigeons gained much of the military fame during World War I, where Allied forces used as many as 200,000 of them. One pigeon named Cher Ami even earned the French “Croix de Guerre” for delivering 12 messages between forts in the Verdun, France region. He made his last message delivery despite suffering serious bullet injuries, and is credited with saving the “Lost Battalion” of the U.S. 77th Infantry Division, which had become cut off by German forces. Another group of 32 pigeons earned the British Dickin medal for animal valor during the D-Day invasion of World War II, when Allied soldiers kept radio silence and relied upon the pigeons to relay messages. The birds have since retired from military service because of advances in communications technology.
animal-world
6. Navy Dolphins

Bottlenose dolphins have served alongside sea lions in helping the U.S. Navy patrol the seas since the 1960s. The brethren of Flipper use their sophisticated biological sonar to search for mines based on the concept of echolocation. A dolphin will send out a series of clicks that bounce off objects and return to the dolphin. That allows the marine mammal to get a mental image of the object, and it can then report to its human handler using certain yes or no responses. The handler can also follow up on a yes response by sending the dolphin to mark the object’s location with a weighted buoy line. Those mine-marking abilities came in handy during both the Persian Gulf War and the Iraq War, with Navy dolphins helping to clear the port of Umm Qasr in southern Iraq during the latter. Dolphins can also tag enemy swimmers, but the U.S. Navy denies rumors about training dolphins to use weapons against humans.

animal-world
7. War Elephants

The largest living land mammals on Earth left their mark in warfare as creatures capable of devastating packed formations of enemy troops. Elephants could trample, pierce soldiers with their tusks and even throw hapless humans with their trunks. They sometimes wore armor or carried archers and javelin throwers. Ancient kingdoms of India may have been first to tame elephants as living tanks, but the practice soon spread to the Persians in the Middle East. Alexander the Great encountered enemy elephants during his conquests of the ancient world, and eventually the Greeks, Carthaginians and Romans made use of war elephants at certain times. Horses feared the sight and smell of elephants, and human soldiers also had to deal with the psychological terror of facing down the huge animals. Still, elephants could go mad with fear or pain after taking too much punishment, and the advent of cannons on the battlefield essentially ended their combat role.
animal-world
8. Military Mules

Mules have played an unsung but crucial role throughout the history of warfare by carrying or pulling along much of the food, weapons and other supplies needed by armies. Born from a male donkey and a female horse, they became preferred over horses for carrying loads because of their greater endurance. They also displayed more intelligence and unwillingness to push to the point of injury, which led to the stereotype of being stubborn. Still, the ancient Roman legions marched with about one mule for every 10 Roman legionaries. Napoleon Bonaparte himself rode a mule across the Alps, in addition to using the animals in his baggage trains. The U.S. Army alone used about 571,000 horses and mules in Europe during World War I, and lost about 68,000 killed in action. Mules have continued to find use even today, as U.S. Special Forces, marines and soldiers rely upon the animals to keep supply lines open for remote outposts in the mountains of Afghanistan.
animal-world9. Dogs of War

Most people may look upon man’s best friend as a cuddly creature, but humans have let slip the dogs of war for thousands of years. Large breeds served as war dogs on the battlefield and as defensive sentries for everyone from the Egyptians to Native Americans. The Romans equipped some of their dogs with spiked collars and armor, and the Spanish conquistadors also used armored attack dogs during their invasion of South America in the 1500s. Many European factions and nations used war dogs in ancient conflicts and throughout the Middle Ages, but more modern warfare reduced the battlefield role to that of messengers, trackers, scouts and sentries. The U.S. military and others have more recently trained dogs as bomb-sniffing detectors to work in Iraq and Afghanistan, where the four-footed companions get their own bulletproof vests.
animal-world
10. Horses

Perhaps no other animal has played so great a role in the history of warfare as the horse. Humans domesticated horses as early as 5,500 years ago in modern-day Kazakhstan, and the spread of horses across Eurasia soon gave rise to their use in large-scale warfare. The ancient Egyptians and the Chinese used horse-pulled chariots as stable platforms to fight from, before the invention of an effective saddle and stirrup gave mounted warriors a decisive edge. Armored knights on horseback could deliver devastating charges against all but the most steadfast foot-soldier formations. The stability provided by the saddle-and-stirrup combo allowed the Mongols to fight and shoot arrows effectively from horseback, and gave them the mobility to conquer much of the known world. A thunderous appearance of horses on battlefields often signaled the beginning of the end for civilizations that lacked similar warrior mounts. Major combat use of horses did not waver until the modern era of warfare, when tanks and machine guns entered the fray.


animal-worldVia: livescience.com

Read more...

  © Blogger templates Newspaper III by Ourblogtemplates.com 2008

Back to TOP