Monday, November 30, 2009

Amazing animal-Cute baby elephant

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Sunday, November 29, 2009

Bizarre facts-Einstein's Brain

After the death of Albert Einstein his brain was removed by a pathologist and put in a jar for future study.

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Saturday, November 28, 2009

Amazingly realistic sketches

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Friday, November 27, 2009

Interesting facts-Water in a lifetime

An average human drinks about 16,000 gallons of water in a lifetime.

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Thursday, November 26, 2009

Worlds-Biggest-Tabbouleh-Salad-003

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Amazing happenings-Glowing animals

Rhesus Macaque Monkey
How does it glow?
Green fluorescent protein, introduced into DNA of egg via virus (2008)

What can we learn?
Scientists at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta are using green fluorescent protein to study Huntington's disease, which destroys nervous tissue.
In 2008 the researchers infected unfertilized monkey eggs with an HIV-like virus, which changed the eggs' DNA to include the defect that causes Huntington's.
The virus also introduced a protein that would make rhesus monkeys fluoresce under ultraviolet light (as pictured)--making it easier to study the effects of the disease on the monkeys' brains.

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Cats
How does it glow?
Red fluorescent protein, introduced via a virus into cloned DNA, which was implanted in cat eggs, then implanted in mother (2007)

What can we learn?
Scientists at Gyoengsang National University in South Korea both cloned a Turkish Angora house cat and made it fluorescent—as shown in the glowing cat (left) photographed in a dark room under ultraviolet light. (The nonfluorescent cat, at right, appears green in these conditions.)
The scientists weren't the first to clone a cat--they weren't even the first to clone a fluorescent cat. But they were the first to clone a cat that fluoresces red. It's hoped that the red glow, which appears in every organ of the cats, will improve the study of genetic diseases.


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Pigs
How does it glow?
Green fluorescent protein, added to embryos (2006)

What can we learn?
Researchers at the National Taiwan University implanted green fluorescent protein into pigs. Seen above in ordinary light, one such pig appears yellowish. Under ultraviolet light, the pigs glow green. Though earlier experiments had beaten the Taiwanese scientists to the glowing-pig punch, no one else had done it quite as well, the Taiwanese group said: Their pigs glowed inside and out. The scientists hope to use the fluorescence to track the development of adult stem cells in the pigs, which are genetically very similar to humans.

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Dog
How does it glow?
Red fluorescent protein, introduced via a virus into cloned DNA (2009)

What can we learn?
In the same city that gave the world its first cloned, fluorescent- red cat, another group of Seoul scientists - this time at Seoul National University-engineered the world's first cloned, fluorescent red dog on April 26, 2009.
Ruppy the beagle--a combination of "ruby" and "puppy"--is the first successful clone of a genetically modified dog. Believe it or not, the glow wasn't the point of the experiment-- just evidence of the genetically modified nature of the beast.
The ability to clone genetically modified dogs should improve the study of human genetic diseases in dogs, such as Parkinson's, according to the research team.

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Mice
How do they glow?
Green fluorescent protein, received via DNA from father, which had been implanted with glowing sperm-creating cells from a flourescent mouse (2004)

What can we learn?
University of Pennsylvania researchers figured out how to maintain and grow glowing, sperm-creating stem cells from genetically modified fluorescent mice.
The team then implanted the cells into infertile mice, which "miraculously" fathered three of the pups pictured--and the offspring of the lucky mice "men" glowed green under ultraviolet light, tipping the scientists off to their success.

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Emperor Scorpion
How does it glow?
Beta-carboline, naturally occurring

What can we learn?
Adults of any scorpion species naturally glow green-yellow or blue under ultraviolet light.
First scientifically described in 1954, the phenomenon led to the creation of "scorpion detectors"-- black lights--which made camping in scorpion-prone climates a less intimidating proposition. Using ultraviolet light, scientists have been able to study the scorpions in their native nocturnal habitats without disturbing the animals, which may lead to new insights into how we might avoid them. For example, a 1972 report documented scorpions as high as 8 feet (2.5 meters) in trees.
A 2001 Marshall University paper suggested that--sometime in the past, when the insects may not have been strictly nocturnal--the scorpions may have evolved their UV-reflecting armor as a sort of sunblock.
But arachnophobes, take note: Young scorpions don't glow under ultraviolet light, because the arachnids' fluorescence doesn't develop until later in life.

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Fish
How does it glow?
Green, yellow, and red fluorescent protein, introduced into its DNA (2003)

What can we learn?
In 1999 scientists at the National University of Singapore began working with zebra fish and green fluorescent protein, hoping to engineer a fish that would glow in the presence of toxic chemicals. In the process, the scientists created fish that fluoresce all the time (under ultraviolet light) and in a range of colors. A few years later, the first fluorescent pet hit the market, after Singapore had become the first country to authorize the sale of the genetically modified fish in 2003. Later that year "GloFish" (pictured) debuted in the United States, where in 2009 they retail for five to ten dollars at some pet stores.
Though fluorescent pet fish have spawned no scientific advances, they inspired the creation and clarification of laws governing genetically modified pets. The United States, for example, was initially forced to classify the genetic modification as a drug.

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Nematode Worm
How does it glow?
Green fluorescent protein, introduced into its DNA (2005)

What can we learn?
In 2005 University of Utah biologists wanted to study worm rhythm. They isolated a gene they believed to control swallowing, egg laying, and pooping.
To test their hypothesis, the team tagged the gene with green fluorescent protein in a worm. Sure enough, the throat, intestines, and gonads of the animal all glowed green (pictured at right).
To double-check, the team disabled the gene in another worm. That gave them a worm that could not swallow (left), which died at a small size because it could not eat.
The experiment may sound esoteric, but humans have rhythmic activities--swallowing, ovulating, giving birth, defecating controlled by a similar gene, so the glowing worm could lead to solutions for a variety of ailments.

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Bacteria
How does it glow?
Multiple colors of fluorescent protein, introduced into its DNA (2008)

What can we learn?
One of the team of scientists that won a 2008 Nobel Prize for green fluorescent protein--Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Y. Tsien couldn' t resist showing off their creation a bit. From Tsien's lab comes this artful plate with selectively swabbed fluorescent bacteria.
The discovery of green fluorescent protein by Shimomura in 1956 was the result of crushing countless jellyfish.
After publishing his findings in 1962, Shimomura studied GFP in detail and realized that no extra fuel was needed to make it glow-other glowing substances need chemical additives to shine. GFP, by contrast, just needed to be exposed to ultraviolet light.
Chalfie, the third of the GFP Nobel winners, realized the maintenance- free protein could be used to literally watch how creatures work. He proved with the intestinal bacterium E. coli that GFP alone--with no fuel--glowed, and promptly started putting it into roundworms. Roger Tsien kicked it up a notch by reengineering GFP to be cyan, blue, and yellow. Yet more colors were found in fluorescent coral. He remixed these materials into glowing proteins such as "mPlum," "mStrawberry, " and "mOrange."
Though their inventions may have revolutionized the fields of medicine, biology, and chemistry, the fluorescent proteins also have creative applications, as shown above. Fluorescent proteins have also been used in the name of art to make sculptures out of glowing beakers and live glowing rabbits.

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Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Did you know-Villains

Most of the villains in the bible have red hair

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Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Strange happenings-Indian village With 250 sets of Twins

Doctors are trying to unravel the mystery of an Indian village boasting 250 sets of twins born to just 2,000 families.
The phenomenon has seen almost six times as many twins born than the global average in the remote village of Kodinhi, in Kerala, India.

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strange-happeningsIn 2008 alone 15 pairs of twins were born in the village out of 300 healthy deliveries and this year is expected to top that number.

strange-happeningsIn the last five years alone up to 60 pairs of twins have been born, with the rate of twins increasing year-on-year.
strange-happeningsLocal doctor and twin enthusiast Dr Krishnan Sribiju has been studying the medical marvel of Kodinhi for the past two years. Although 250 sets of twins have been officially registered in the village Dr Sribiju believes the real number to be far higher. "In my medical opinion there are around 300 to 350 twins within the village boundaries of Kodinhi," he said.

strange-happeningsAccording to villagers, the twin phenomenon only started occurring three generations ago. Dr Sribiju said "To the best of my knowledge this medical marvel began somewhere between 60 to 70 years ago."
strange-happenings"Without access to detailed biochemical analysis equipment I cannot say for certain what the reason for the twinning is, but I feel that it is something to do with what the villagers eat and drink"
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Monday, November 23, 2009

Strange facts-Gold

Twenty-Four-Karat Gold is not pure gold since there is a small amount of copper in it. Absolutely pure gold is so soft that it can be molded with the hands.

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Sunday, November 22, 2009

Amazing pictures of Ice Storm in USA

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Saturday, November 21, 2009

Interesting facts-Frog derby

A frog named Santjie, who was in a frog derby in South Africa jumped 33 feet 5.5 inches.

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Friday, November 20, 2009

Amazing animals-Best Animal dads

Made famous by the movie March of the Penguins, emperor penguin fathers endure below-freezing temperatures and forgo food to incubate their eggs.
After the female lays a single egg, her mate rests it on his feet and covers it with a flap of skin (above, a penguin protects its chick using the same skin flap).
"You could think of that pouch as almost a male womb, except they're birds," the University of Reading's Pagel said. "They're very much like seahorses in that respect: [They've] taken over a role rightly or wrongly we traditionally associate with females."
For four months the males huddle together, not moving much, while the females fill up on seafood in the ocean. The females eventually return to help feed the newly hatched chicks.


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Father's Day, honors committed human dads. But seahorse fathers (above, a newborn hitches a ride on dad's tail) might just blow those proud papas out of the water.
Seahorses are a type of fish in which the males actually get "pregnant." The female seahorse deposits her eggs in the male's specialized pouch, and the male carries up to 2,000 babies during its 10- to 25-day pregnancy.


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Male marmosets in South America not only carry, feed, and groom their twin babies (pictured, a baby black-tailed marmoset with its mother in a Tokyo zoo), they may even act as "midwives" during birth, grooming and licking the newborns.
Marmoset dads may be so involved because of the high cost of birth for the mother, whose unborn babies eventually make up 25 percent of her body weight—equal to a 120-pound (55-kilogram) woman giving birth to a 30-pound (14-kilogram) infant.
Though nature's default is female-only care, animal fathers such as marmosets will often pitch in when "kids are expensive," for instance, when raising offspring requires two full-time parents that are mated for life, the University of Winnipeg's Forbes said.

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Talk about back-breaking work—the male giant water bug literally totes around his brood of about 150 eggs until they hatch.
After a courtship of sparring and grasping, these ferocious insects mate, and the females cement their fertilized eggs to the males' backs with a natural glue.
Over the next three weeks, the male becomes a "very effective dad," said Scott Forbes, a University of Winnipeg biologist and author of A Natural History of Families. The daddy water bug fiercely protects his eggs and periodically exposes them to air to prevent them from growing mold.

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The barking frog named for its throaty, dog-like callguards his brood after the female lays her eggs under rocks or logs in the U.S. Southwest.
The frog hangs out by the eggs for several weeks, wetting the eggs with his urine if they dry out.
In other frog species, males carry their larvae wrapped around their legs or swallow their newly hatched tadpoles to shelter them in special mouth sacs, Forbes added, giving the offspring a safe haven in which to develop.

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For most birds, females are stuck with child care, but not so for the South America's greater rhea (above, chicks nestle into their dad's back feathers at Washington D.C.'s National Zoo).
Females mate with several males during the breeding season, and several birds will lay their eggs in a nest created by a male. The male then incubates up to 50 eggs for six weeks and cares for the newly hatched young. The dads aggressively guard the babies, charging at any animal—even a female rhea—that approaches.

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Thursday, November 19, 2009

Amazing pictures-Creative mailboxes around the world

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